Employee Spotlight: Pradeep Arigue

Pradeep Arigue
Pradeep Arigue

Once the owner of a Quality Assurance business himself, Pradeep Arigue holds a Bachelors of Computer Applications, and has over 10 years’ experience in the industry. He first joined the IBS team in 2012 as a QA Analyst, eventually becoming QA Lead, and is now our QA Practice Manager.

Working onsite at client facilities in the US, Pradeep also manages the IBS offshore QA team based in Hyderabad India. When asked what he likes about working with IBS, Pradeep notes the work environment. “I love that there is always something new to learn. I consider myself very fortunate to work in a field that is always changing and growing with new technologies, capabilities and ideas.”

Initially from India, Pradeep first traveled to the US in 2014, making his 5th trip in September of 2018. Currently, he’s working with IBS’ insurance and finance clients, setting up their QA practices and creating automation proof of concepts.  When he’s not researching the latest technologies, Pradeep enjoys playing cricket and seeking out the new best Thai and Mexican restaurants he can find!

Postman – Using Environments and Tokens

Rick Herrmann

Postman is an incredibly  useful tool for testing API’s.  I’ve been using it for a few years now and have found some features that make it a breeze to work with when it comes to secured API’s. It’s good for handling different environments as well.

Login and Tokens

A common pattern we use with our API’s is to use Javascript Web Tokens(JWT’s) for authentication. To work with this in Postman, I typically have a /login post call which returns a token. Then for any other calls to that API, I manually copy the returned token, and set the Authorization header to “Bearer <token>”. Although this works, it’s a pain when the login token expires and I have to copy a new token to the Authorization header for every saved API call.  For an API where you have a lot of endpoints saved, updating all the Authorization headers can become tedious. Continue reading “Postman – Using Environments and Tokens”

Challenges Testing in Agile

Challenges Testing in Agile

Though a number of organizations and businesses have implemented some sort of QA practice into their development cycle, a large percentage of them still do not have a dedicated resource handling testing. This means they’re taking developers with a specialized skillset away from what they do best to focus on QA. While many organizations have incorporated agile into their development process, they have not done so in their QA process.  Continue reading “Challenges Testing in Agile”

Angular 2 – Testing

Rick HerrmannWriting tests has been something I’ve been a proponent of for many years.  My testing experience started with C# and then continued on the front end with javascript and Angular 1.  So when I started learning Angular 2, I naturally wanted to see what the testing story was.

The front-end testing I’ve done in the past has always had some friction with respect to getting the tools setup properly.  Mostly I have used Jasmine as the testing framework, which is pretty self contained – but to get a node test server setup properly there are a variety of other npm modules and karma configuration settings to deal with.  I previously wrote about how the angular-cli makes it easy to get an Angular 2 project setup, and this includes getting the test tools setup as well.  So instead of dealing with configuration settings, you can quickly get to just writing tests.

Continue reading “Angular 2 – Testing”

Testing Angular Services

Rick HerrmannUntil recently, the front-end testing I’d done had not directly tested any Angular services. In almost every case, the $http calls in the services were just returning data from an API back to a controller. However, on a recent project I had a scenario where the data from the API had to have some filtering and permission logic applied before passing on the data. This was a case where unit testing the service made sense.

As it turns out, testing a service is very similar to testing a controller in terms of setting up the test, injecting dependencies, and making assertions. The only real difference is the need to mock the $http call in the service. To do this the angular-mocks library provides the $httpBackend tool. Let’s walk through an example of testing a service.

Continue reading “Testing Angular Services”

Javascript Testing with Jasmine

Rick HerrmannOne of the features I like about Jasmine is that the ability to mock objects and do interaction based testing is built into the tool.  When testing C# code (with NUnit, MSTest, or even NSpec) you have to pull in another tool to handle mocking.

In Jasmine, mock objects are called spies.  Accordingly, there is a built-in function called spyOn, which takes two parameters:

Continue reading “Javascript Testing with Jasmine”

Priorities in Testing

Rick HerrmannHow do we know we have enough tests?

A common rule of thumb is 80% code coverage. But I think the flaw with that metric is that it treats all areas of the code base with equal importance.  For example, I would say that code for CRUD operations in the admin section (for example) is less important than the code that accepts customer payment and issues an insurance policy.  In this case, it actually would matter a great deal which 20% of the code is not tested.

Continue reading “Priorities in Testing”