WHAT’S NEW IN OFFICE 365 (NOVEMBER 2018)

October was a great month for those of us in the IT Pro space in Office 365, especially with the SharePoint Online Admin center enhancements. Unfortunately, we have yet to see the Teams Administration Dashboard in our tenant or any of our customers tenants but hopefully by typing this up we will assure ourselves of sticking our foot in out mouth and it will pop up. While many of the “big” developments from October are geared towards IT folks, there were still a couple noteworthy updates for the user base as well.

Side-note: If you plan to be in or around Chicago, IL in the beginning of December and want to increase your knowledge on Office 365/SharePoint head over to the SharePoint Fest Chicago event being held 12/3/2018 – 12/7/2018. Don’t let the name mislead you, they cover a lot of SharePoint items, but you will also see many other Office 365 applications covered as well as Azure topics. The event has different levels of sessions for end users, power users, IT professionals and developers so it really is for everyone. Continue reading “WHAT’S NEW IN OFFICE 365 (NOVEMBER 2018)”

SharePoint Framework On-Premise Deploy via Gulp

SharePoint 2016 Server has support for SharePoint Framework, however there are some features missing that are present in SharePoint Online.

When first learning SharePoint Framework (SPFx), the tutorials provided by Microsoft are geared towards using SPFx in SharePoint Online.  A lot of the knowledge and concepts transfer to SharePoint 2016 Server, however I found a key feature missing: Asset deployment.

SPFx solutions expect you to host your assets (html, javascript, css) in some location that is accessible from your SharePoint site.  In SharePoint Online, the deployment gulp task that comes packaged with SPFx can (and by default, does) deploy your assets to the SharePoint Online App Catalog site.  With SharePoint 2016 Server, asset deployment is your responsibility.  I did not like this at all – I wanted a simple, configurable script/task to run that would deploy my assets where I wanted them to go.

First the setup.  Continue reading “SharePoint Framework On-Premise Deploy via Gulp”

Review of How to Ensure Operational Governance for Microsoft Teams Session from Microsoft Ignite 2018

Microsoft Ignite was held September 24-28 in Orlando, Florida with more than 1600 sessions on all that Microsoft has to offer. This session, by Dux Raymond Sy, covered guidelines for proper governance of Microsoft Teams. Dux makes basic recommendations but cautions listeners that Azure Active Directory P1 is a requirement for some of the features he highlights.

Overall, it was an informative session. Dux does a great job explaining the relationship between Microsoft Teams and Office 365 Groups; and breaking down governance into 3 manageable areas: provisioning, operations and information cycle. Continue reading “Review of How to Ensure Operational Governance for Microsoft Teams Session from Microsoft Ignite 2018”

MS Flow and Azure: Creating Parent and Sub sites

The Assignment

Recently we were asked by a client to develop a MS Flow that creates a sub site when users enter a new item into a SharePoint list. What we found was there’s no simple, out of the box way to have the new sub site inherit the top navigation of the parent site. As a result, we needed to create an Azure Function to preform this function.  Continue reading “MS Flow and Azure: Creating Parent and Sub sites”

What’s New In Office 365 (July 2018)

It’s been another busy month for Office 365 updates.  Many of the updates that rolled out Duane Odumwere ahead of schedule which can be nice for folks that were waiting on a specific update to implement a solution.  However, it’s nice when the Office 365 Roadmap is accurate😊.

Microsoft 365 Admin Center

This one’s been in the pipeline for some time but if you haven’t checked it out yet be prepared for some changes.  Content is still very similar so it’s not a terribly difficult adjustment but anything with Administration rights in Office 365 should get familiar with the new layout sooner rather than later at https://admin.microsoft.com. Continue reading “What’s New In Office 365 (July 2018)”

SharePoint Frameworks (SPFx) Impressions

Mike Berryman

With the push to move away from On-Premise SharePoint environments in favor of the Office 365 SharePoint environment, Microsoft has drastically changed the landscape of SharePoint development.  I’ve been a SharePoint developer since 2007 and making the jump to SharePoint Online has been the most jarring change yet.  Of course when SharePoint Online was first announced and as features have been introduced, I’ve played around with them in a strictly “Hello World” capacity, but as any developer will tell you, creating a “Hello World” project for play purposes is drastically different from actually creating a real-world-use project.

I recently got to create my first “real” SharePoint Framework Web Part and here are my thoughts, as someone coming from over 10 years of On-Premise SharePoint development.

Continue reading “SharePoint Frameworks (SPFx) Impressions”

Microsoft Flow

What is Flow?

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Microsoft Flow is tool that allows one to create and automate workflows across multiple applications. To create a flow, the user specifies what action should take place when a specific event occurs. The most common use of flow is to trigger notifications. For example, flow can be used to send someone a notification when an item is added to a list.

Flows can also be used to collect data. For instance, if the user wants to see what people are saying about a particular brand, they can create a trigger that will capture new tweets that mention the brand and put a copy of each tweet into a database for further analysis. Once a flow is built, it can be managed on the desktop or through an app on a mobile device. Additionally, Flow can be integrated with other various Microsoft services. The Microsoft Flow Admin Center allows an administrator to manage users, permissions and roles and ensure that employee-created flows comply with data loss prevention policies. Continue reading “Microsoft Flow”