Microsoft Flow

What is Flow?

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Microsoft Flow is tool that allows one to create and automate workflows across multiple applications. To create a flow, the user specifies what action should take place when a specific event occurs. The most common use of flow is to trigger notifications. For example, flow can be used to send someone a notification when an item is added to a list.

Flows can also be used to collect data. For instance, if the user wants to see what people are saying about a particular brand, they can create a trigger that will capture new tweets that mention the brand and put a copy of each tweet into a database for further analysis. Once a flow is built, it can be managed on the desktop or through an app on a mobile device. Additionally, Flow can be integrated with other various Microsoft services. The Microsoft Flow Admin Center allows an administrator to manage users, permissions and roles and ensure that employee-created flows comply with data loss prevention policies. Continue reading “Microsoft Flow”

Connecting Existing Sites to Office 365 Groups…Kind of

One of the big announcements from the SharePoint conference in May was Microsoft planning to allow the connection of existing Team Sites to Office 365 Groups.  This was also championed at Ignite a few weeks ago and Microsoft even put out some more specific guidance on this in the Work better together with SharePoint Team Sites Office 365 App Integrations post by Mark Kashman. Roughly 1/3 of the way down the page there is a heading titled Connect an existing SharePoint team site to a new Office 365 group that details out exactly what we will need to do.  This is awesome, we can take advantage of all the benefits of Office 365 groups for our existing team sites…not so fast. Continue reading “Connecting Existing Sites to Office 365 Groups…Kind of”

Office 365 Collaboration Confusion

A couple weeks ago, Microsoft held their annual Ignite conference and I would usually be blogging about all the cool new things coming to Office 365. This year has been a bit a different experience altogether, not for a lack of features announced from Microsoft though…there were plenty of awesome new features announced. We’ve spent the past couple weeks fielding questions on Office 365 from existing customers and folks looking to make the move or at least understand the options available.

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Setup Xamarin iOS to Login to Azure ADAL and Sharepoint Online

misc1This project takes a lot from this and makes changes for the new API (you must register your SharePoint application with Azure AD).  This document sets up Azure AD for Sharepoint Online.

When using the ADAL package on the Xamarin iPhone emulator, it requires quite a process to get up and running.  Installing ADAL requires the NuGet Package  “Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory”. Once that’s installed, you must create an authenticator service to assist with authenticating.

Continue reading “Setup Xamarin iOS to Login to Azure ADAL and Sharepoint Online”

Why Microsoft Teams Works For Me?

Duane OdumOn 3/14/2017 Microsoft Teams was generally released to Office 365 tenants around the world.  Being that I am an Office 365 consultant I had already been tinkering with it for a while during the testing phase. Prior to my fiddling I read through the various blog posts from experts in the field and the two posts that stuck with me were by Benjamin Niaulin and Naomi Moneypenny. I highly suggest reading both of those articles if you or your organization is interested in learning more about where Microsoft Teams fits in with the rest of the Office 365 capabilities. I am adding another link to a great post at the bottom of the article as well but those are the two that I started with and suggest you do the same.

Continue reading “Why Microsoft Teams Works For Me?”

SharePoint Framework General Availability

Duane OdumOn 2/23/2017 Microsoft announced the General Availability release of the SharePoint Framework to Office 365 tenancies.  This is a very exciting time for SharePoint developers as the SharePoint Framework allows us to take advantage of development tools and processes that truly enhance the developer experience.  Having worked with multiple client side development toolkits in the past I can honestly say “It’s about time!”.

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Microsoft Flow Overview

Duane OdumPrior to the May 4th event in 2016 there was a blog post by James Phillips titled Power to the people: introducing Microsoft Flow and announcing the public preview of PowerApps.  Microsoft Flow became generally available on October 31st 2016 and although its use case is not restricted to Office 365 or Microsoft products it has certainly started to pick up some steam in the Office 365 community.

At its core Microsoft Flow is really a cloud based “if this then that” (commonly abbreviated to IFTTT) solution that is intended to enable Power Users to create business applications in an easy to use editor.  When used along with Power BI and PowerApps Microsoft Flow can certainly allow non-developers the ability to create some pretty solid applications to solve business problems.  There are numerous Microsoft Flow Templates and services already available to get you started and those numbers are only going to increase as the technology picks up more momentum.

Continue reading “Microsoft Flow Overview”