There are no sites to show right now…but there are!

Recently we  had a customer report an issue with their Office products (Word, Excel and PowerPoint) where there were not seeing their frequently accessed sites for SharePoint Online.

Featured Sites

I remembered reading something about this on a post in Tech Community Blog but thought it was related to Modern Authentication which the customer wouldn’t have touched.  At least I hoped that to be the case and ultimately it was.  So, I reached out to the user experiencing the issue and did all the typical account reset “stuff”:  Signed out of Office, cleared the Credentials Manager and removed/add the Microsoft Account.  No joy, but in speaking with the user it was discovered that the issue cropped up when they moved her mailbox to Exchange Online and courtesy of a Teams screen sharing session I was able to see that the account name for the SharePoint sites as JDoe@contoso.com and the OneDrive was jdoe@contoso.com. Continue reading “There are no sites to show right now…but there are!”

An Overview of Microsoft Teams

An Overview of Microsoft Teams

Microsoft Teams is a unified communications platform that combines workplace chat, video conferencing, file storage and a host of application integration abilities. Teams launched in the fall of 2017 and a free version of the platform was made available the following year, helping Microsoft surpass their competitor Slack in total number of active users. Here we will take a look at some of Team’s most prominent features to understand why it’s become the preferred choice in workplace collaboration.

Intelligent Communications Continue reading “An Overview of Microsoft Teams”

Using SendGrid with Azure Functions to Send Email

I’ve been working on a solution for a customer that utilizes SharePoint Online lists and libraries, PowerApps, Logic Apps, and Azure Functions. The solution works something like this: Project documents are stored and updated in a SharePoint Library by office staff. The shop floor needs to access the documents and know at a glance when documents have been updated. The PowerApp displays a count of the most recently updated documents by project and document type, and also displays the documents. A SharePoint List is used to store the counts of the most recently updated documents. The Logic App and Azure Function work together to update the SharePoint List with the counts from the SharePoint Library.

As part of the solution, we wanted a way to be notified if the Azure Function threw an error. This is where SendGrid comes in. SendGrid is a third-party email delivery service. Azure Functions support an output binding for SendGrid, which makes it very easy to integrate into your solution.Here is a grand overview of how my solution (just the Azure Function and SendGrid piece) will work – If my Azure Function throws an error, it will send the error message to Azure Queue Storage. The error message will be stored in Azure Queue Storage until another Azure Function (2) comes and picks it up. Azure Function (2) will use SendGrid to send an email containing the error message. Easy-peasy. You can use SendGrid to send emails for all kinds of reasons – when a customer places an order, you can send a confirmation email with the details of the order; when someone clicks a button on your site to request information, you can send an email with the requested information; the options are endless.

Continue reading “Using SendGrid with Azure Functions to Send Email”

Staffing Insights with Corey Graves

Staffing Insights with Corey Graves

Recently we sat down with IBS Account Executive Corey Graves to discuss the state of the IT staffing industry. With over 9 years on the job, we talked in-depth about his approach to the market, as well as how he communicates, cultivates, and builds relationships with customers in his network.

As an AE, what are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen throughout your 9 years industry?

Specifically, in terms of the market, the opportunities are more plentiful than they used to be. In fact there’s more opportunities than there are candidates, which you can see reflected in the unemployment rate, especially when it comes to IT. Continue reading “Staffing Insights with Corey Graves”

Office 365 January 2019 Good Reads

There are thousands of articles, blog posts, videos and other information being generated every month for Office 365. It’s impossible to review them all but we are going to be posting our top “good reads” for Office 365 content monthly.  There may be one or two items from the Office 365 Message Center in this list occasionally but for the most part we are going to stick with community contributions that we feel may provide value for our customers and our employees.    Without further ado, please find our “good reads” for January 2019 below😉. Continue reading “Office 365 January 2019 Good Reads”

Open Documents Read-Only in Modern SharePoint

We recently were engaged on a project where we were utilizing PowerApps to present documents to employees via a kiosk application.  The employees needed the ability to edit the documents and be able to open them in Office Online by default, but during testing we noticed that employees were unintentionally modifying files in Office Online. The PowerApp was for a heavy industrial fabrication shop and the target users were often wearing welding equipment and various other safety gear so asking them to be more delicate with the tooling wasn’t really a reasonable request. Continue reading “Open Documents Read-Only in Modern SharePoint”

Codemash 2019

Earlier this month I attended the Codemash developers conference at the Kalahari Waterpark in Sandusky, OH. This was my 11th time going to the conference and I always come back with a list of things I want to learn more about. This year was no different and overall it was probably the best one I have attended. Following are a few of the more interesting sessions I attended.

 

Best Practices for Robust API Development in ASP.NET Core

This was full day workshop that went through in detail a typical API architecture written in .NET Core and including other common packages for Dependency Injection (Autofac), Testing (XUnit), Logging (SeriLog), Mocking (Moq), API Documentation (Swagger), Object Mapping (AutoMapper), plus a working example of using MongoDB with .NET Core. Lots of good takeaways from this.

 

A Hands-on Intro to Containers

Although Docker is not new, I have not really done anything with it before. This ½ day session included an AWS instance with the prerequisites already setup so we were able to go over creating a Docker image, and using DockerHub to find existing images to work with. It was a perfect to getting-started workshop for my level of Docker experience.

 

Database Devops in Docker

This session, in addition to the Docker pre-compiler, went over some cool uses of Docker images.  The most interesting one to me was where the speaker described how each night that take a backup of the their production database, scrub the data of private information, and update an internal Docker image with the database backup.  Then each morning all of the developers can pull the new image and do their development with data that is essentially production data.

 

Service Workers and Intro to Progressive Web Apps

These were two separate sessions but they are very much related technologies.  Service Workers are a key part of Progress Web Apps. I have many years of web development experience and PWA’s are something I have been interested in learning more about.  The PWA session was a great introduction and included details on when a PWA is the appropriate choice for an app, and a lot of good examples on how to setup a PWA.

Overall I feel like the time at Codemash was well spent and as usual I have a list of new tech to on my list of things to learn more about this year.